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Ok. So Leanne won Project Runway.

Some agree with the decision, others don’t.

I’m sure you’ll all be interested in hearing what Tim Gunn had to say about why he judged Leanne’s work more favorably then the others’.

Leanne WINS, and what a win it was! We saw all of the conceptual content that really is at the core of Leanne’s point of view, and we saw it tempered and orchestrated with precision. As I said to her during the home visit: “I always trust that you will present masterful technique, but can you give your work feeling, emotion?” This was her personal challenge. And she did it All of the strong architectural elements that are Leanne were clearly present, but her looks possessed a buoyancy and an ease, an effortlessness that belied each items structure. Furthermore, her collection was the result of superb editing; had she not brought her critical eye and judgment to each looks and its relationship to every other look, then there may have been a different outcome.

On Kenley

Kenley presented a strong point of view and excellent execution, neither of which were surprises, and both of which were appropriately lauded.
I loved Kenley’s textile choices and her hand-painting, which was a risky endeavor, and the silhouettes couldn’t have been more her. But when the looks walked, they possessed a stiffness that I wasn’t prepared to experience. Static on a dress forms, her looks beautifully captured the essence of her inspiration: “painting the roses red” from Alice in Wonderland. (When I made my home visit to her, Kenley resisted revealing her inspiration, which confounded me. When she finally relented, she gave me an epiphany. “Now I get it!” I declared.) But when the clothes walked on the runway, they retained much of their static appearance; that is, most of the looks moved like stiff pasteboard. I could see Kenley’s collection emanating a major “wow!” factor in an editorial spread in Elle, but I had a hard time imagining how they would or could navigate and function in the real world. Still, I loved the fantasy aspect of the collection and its other-worldliness.

On Korto

Korto fully embraced her African heritage and her Americanism. Furthermore, she was successful embracing that goal, which is no small task, especially since the entire collection could have been a costume festival. Her silhouettes, alone, told her story, and when you add the colors, textures, and jewelry, her entire collection was uplifted. Color is nothing if not subjective, and I applaud her decision to step away from the expected and mix up her largely taupe palette with vibrant greens and blues. And the jewelry? Well, from my perspective it was all inextricable from the larger aspect of her point of view and, more particularly, to the individual looks themselves. I loved it. Is her collection for everyone or anyone? Of course not, but whose is?


Congratulations to all!

Read more from Tim’s Blog.

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