Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Tyra Banks

America’s Next Top Model has finally been spun off.

Reuters reports indicate that the new show, “Operation Fabulous,” will feature some familiar faces from the ANTM judging cast.

The CW is spinning off its hit reality series “America’s Next Top Model.”

The network has ordered a pilot for “Operation Fabulous,” starring “Top Model” regulars Jay Manuel and J. Alexander and executive produced by “Top Model” chiefs Tyra Banks and Ken Mok.

On “Fabulous,” “Jay and J,” as Manuel and Alexander are called on “Top Model,” will travel the country giving women makeovers. In various towns, the duo will select five participants and give them “Top Model”-style overhauls — how to dress, wear their hair and makeup and bring out their confidence with the support of family, friends and their community.

The project seeks to capitalize on a fan-favorite “Model” segment, when contestants are given head-to-toe high-fashion makeovers supervised by Alexander.

Manuel and Alexander have been with “Model” since the series’ debut on UPN in 2003. Manuel is the creative director of show’s photo shoots; Alexander is a runway expert who has been a judge for the past few seasons.

“Model” airs twice a year on the CW. Although ratings have ebbed in recent years, the reality show remains the network’s highest-rated series.

“Fabulous” would mark the third fashion-themed reality series on CW from Banks and Mok, who also executive produce the network’s series “Stylista,” slated to debut October 22, which features contestants vying for an editorial position at Elle magazine.

 

Advertisements

Image : Associated Press

As a response to the sluggish economy and the skyrocketing price of food, the New York based RACHAEL RAY and “The Tyra Banks Show” have joined forces.

They’ll help the more than 1 million New Yorkers who access emergency food each year.

Both shows are challenging their daily audience members to bring healthy canned goods to the tapings that will be donated to City Harvest, an organization that helps feed over 260,000 New Yorkers each week.

Tyra might not be making paper like Oprah but isn’t it great she’s doing what she can to help out? 🙂

 Awesome!

Tyra covers the current issue of Bazaar and is featured in the cover story dubbed, “American Dream.”

From the runway to the Oval Office, EVERYTHING IS POSSIBLE for Tyra Banks.

Bazaar casts her as First Lady while she reflects on being a model citizen and the politics of fashion.

View the lookbook.

Read the full article.

If “The Devil Wears Prada” were a reality show, it would be STYLISTA.

That’s what the folks at The CW are saying about their new show, Stylista.

The reality flick follows 11 fashion enthusiasts elbowing one another for a coveted job with the Elle mag editorial team.

But the fall-premiering show set to air Wednesdays at 9 is getting a thumbs down from at least one major fashion commentator.

Nymag.com’s blog, “The Cut” gives a scathingly honest review.

In the few clips we saw (you can watch more here and here), it became immediately apparent that Stylista will be carefully constructed to mimic The Devil Wears Prada. Slowey’s office vaguely looks like Meryl Streep’s from the film, and when Slowey enters it, she carelessly flops her coats onto one of two assistant desks outside, just like in the movie.

 It highlights in a painfully obvious way how desperately Elle wants to be Vogue. And it’s uncomfortable.

I’ll admit it, with the promotional spots in full swing on The CW, good reviews or not, I’m still curious about what Tyra Banks and Ken Mok (of ANTM fame) have cooked up for this one in their roles as executive producers.

Be your own judge and watch the preview here.




Why are the ANTM winners not on the runway?!

Eva Marcille (formerly Pigford), ANTM alum, joins the cast of THE YOUNG AND THE RESTLESS next Wednesday on CBS. 

Marcille plays Tyra Hamilton, Devon’s (Bryton McClure) aunt, who is a single mother to daughter Ana. 

We ♥ the fact that this issue is getting so much attention.

And now fashion thought leader and New York Times writer, Cathy Horyn, takes a look at the dilemma of the diminishing number of minority models on the runway.

RACIAL prejudice in the fashion industry has long persisted because of tokenism and lookism. “We already have our black girl,” says a designer to a fashion-show casting agent, declining to see others. Or: “She doesn’t have the right look.” Laziness, paranoia and pedantry may also have something to do with the failure to hire black models for shows and magazine features in any meaningful number, but, hey, that’s just a guess.

 

A decade ago the thing to deplore was the stereotyping of black models by dressing them in African-inspired clothes (or the Asian girls in kimonos). This at least gave work to minority models, but it also encouraged a Western view of African culture of the many-bangles-many-beads variety.

O.K., so fashion ain’t deep. It looks into a mirror and sees …itself. The irony in fashion is that it loves change but it can’t actually change anything. It can only reflect a change in the air. But what changes fashion? What would finally move American designers to include more black models on their runways? That 30 percent of the country is nonwhite? That black women spend $20 billion a year on clothes? That an African-American is the presumptive presidential nominee of the Democratic Party?

The answer is the individual eye.

In fashion, one of the most influential eyes belongs to the photographer Steven Meisel. His pictures have caught an America basking in the earnest, self-reflected glow of celebrity and money. He has taken innumerable risks, especially with “Sex,” the 1992 volume he did with Madonna, that have paid off with a career that allows him to do whatever he wants.

And he has almost lovingly photographed some of the world’s beautiful women, tapping into their psyches, connecting with them on a human level, while transforming them into fashion deities.

As the model Veronica Webb, who first worked with Mr. Meisel 20 years ago, said: “Steven knows every single tic, every talent that every girl has. He just pulls it out of them.”

 

For the July issue of Italian Vogue, Mr. Meisel has photographed only black models. In a reverse of the general pattern of fashion magazines, all the faces are black, and all the feature topics are related to black women in the arts and entertainment. Mr. Meisel was given roughly 100 pages for his pictures. The issue will be on European newsstands next Thursday and in the United States soon after.

Read the full article.